Flory JagodaSights & Sounds

The Life of Flory Jagoda: the keeper of the flame

Born in 1926 in Sarajevo, Bosnia, Flory Jagoda learned songs from her grandmother, or “Nona” as she calls her, who knew the musical traditions passed down through their Sephardic Jewish …

Sights & Sounds

Light the Candles with Flory Jagoda’s internationally loved Hanukkah anthem “Ocho Kandelikas”

As the holidays enter full swing, Christmas songs—ranging from the insipid to the sublime—become a seemingly ubiquitous presence in our lives. Largely buried in a sonic avalanche of sleigh bells, …

The Flory Jagoda Sephardic Music FundNews

Schedule and Special Guests Announced for Apprenticeship Showcase

The Virginia Folklife Apprenticeship Showcase at James Monroe’s Highland on May 6 from 12:00 to 5:00pm will welcome Virginia’s 73rd Governor, Ralph Northam, to celebrate the masters and apprentices carrying …

Sights & Sounds

Susan Gaeta and Gina Sobel

When the Sephardic Jews were forced into exile from Spain and Portugal in the late fifteenth century, many settled in other Mediterranean countries but preserved their native language, Ladino, and …

Sights & Sounds

Memories of Hanukkah: Flory Jagoda’s “Ocho Kandelikas”

As the holidays enter full swing, Christmas songs—ranging from the insipid to the sublime—become a seemingly ubiquitous presence in our lives. Largely buried in a sonic avalanche of sleigh bells, …

Sights & Sounds

Dale Wise and Lori Sallade

The accordion, a box-shaped instrument first patented in Vienna in 1829, was a folk instrument played largely by commoners. At the turn of the twentieth century, European emigrants took the …

Sights & Sounds

Apprenticeships Merge: Dale Wise restores Flory Jagoda’s accordion

Flory Jagoda, a master artist of the Sephardic ballad tradition, escaped from Bosnia in 1941. Her only possession was her Hohner Student III accordion. More than seventy years later, Dale …

Sights & Sounds

Susan Gaeta: From Her Nona’s Drawer

Flory Jagoda, a 2002 recipient of a National Heritage Fellowship, is known as “the keeper of the flame” of the once rich Saphardic Jewish song tradition. Flory sings the songs she learned from her nona (grandmother) as a child in pre-WWII Sarajevo – songs which have been passed down in her family since they fled the Spanish Inquisition in 1492. All of her ballads are sung in Ladino, a Judeo-Spanish language dating back centuries.

Susan Gaeta, an accomplished musician in her own right, demonstrates a deep intellectual and personal interest in carrying on this precious traditional art form.

Sights & Sounds

Flory Jagoda and Aviva Chernick

Flory Jagoda was born in 1925 in Sarajevo, Bosnia, and was raised in the city’s Sephardic Jewish community. When the Sephardic Jews were forced into exile from Spain and Portugal …

Sights & Sounds

Flory Jagoda

“Don’t open your mouth. Just sit and play. Keep on playing.” Flory Jagoda (photo right) sings songs she learned from her nona (grandmother) as a child in pre-WWII Sarajevo – …

Sights & Sounds

Flory Jagoda and Susan Gaeta

When the Sephardic Jews were forced into exile from Spain and Portugal in the fifteenth century, many settled in other Mediterranean countries but preserved their native language, called Ladino. Flory …